Mark Sampson says racism allegation made against him is untrue

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Stevenage director Mark Sampson says he’s innocent of claims racism made against him, insisting the”allegation is untrue.”
The former England Women boss – later Dinoi Maamria had been disregarded named manager of Sky Bet League Two side Stevenage to a temporary foundation on September 8 – was accused of using speech that was racially discriminatory towards a trainer who lost his job in the club.
The FA is presently investigating the complaint, some thing Sampson dismissed the claim and says he is happy to co-operate together with, though Stevenage have looked into the issue.
After the Hertfordshire club lost 3-2 at home to Carlisle in his first match in charge, Talking, Sampson thanked the team.
“Ever since I first walked in the doorway I have been forced to feel welcome, through good times and bad,” he said.
“I’m quite confident you will find great times to come for this bar.
“I am fully aware there was an allegation created and I have contributed already to some club evaluation and that I mean to contribute fully into an FA investigation.
“The allegation is untrue. There are.
“I’m very optimistic what will be investigated fully and that due process will be followed closely.
“The outcome will hopefully be that this can be concluded and the football club can move on and start working to the most important thing, which is the gamers, the supporters and everything goes on on the field.”
Sampson directed the Lionesses to place but he was afterwards dismissed by the FA after he was fortunate to have had a connection with a participant during his time as coach of Bristol Academy.
That followed before accusations of bullying and discrimination made from striker Eniola Aluko against Sampson while he was England Women, that had been researched by the FA, who afterwards cleared him of any wrongdoing.

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